Crossing brooklyn ferry

Wishing to suggest the quality of spiritual unification, Whitman has used the metaphor of a chemical solution: "The float forever held in solution" is the infinite ocean of spiritual life which contains the "potential" of all life.

Who knows but I am as good as looking at you now, for all you cannot see me? To him, the universe seems compact, harmonious, and well-adjusted. There is something about this vision that is disorienting as well. Recalling the scene of the river and the people with whom he was associated, he evokes the spiritual bond that links man with his fellow men.

He realizes that the bonds between himself and other people are subtle but enduring. Who knows but I am enjoying this?

Crossing brooklyn ferry

Gaze, loving and thirsting eyes, in the house or street or public assembly! Throb, baffled and curious brain! He says that it is the physical world that binds us all together and allows us to know our own souls. The speaker's tone in the poem is honest but also grateful. He acknowledges that he has a sinful streak - but in society, everyone plays a role. The ferry symbolizes this spatial and temporal movement. While Wordsworth is more concerned with the idea of the power of place, Coleridge, like Whitman, is more interested in the relevance of shared experience, and its ability to potentially transcend barriers of space and mortality. Gorgeous clouds of the sun-set! These lists create a powerful and detailed image, so that the reader can travel alongside Whitman on the "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry. His world is dominated by a sense of good, and evil has a very subservient place in it. Though all of the passengers are following their ordinary daily ritual, the speaker finds them to be "curious" strange. The coming together of these men and women symbolizes the spiritual unity of men in this world. It is not you alone who know what it is to be evil; I am he who knew what it was to be evil; I too knitted the old knot of contrariety, Blabb'd, blush'd, resented, lied, stole, grudg'd, Had guile, anger, lust, hot wishes I dared not speak, Was wayward, vain, greedy, shallow, sly, cowardly, malignant; The wolf, the snake, the hog, not wanting in me, The cheating look, the frivolous word, the adulterous wish, not wanting, Refusals, hates, postponements, meanness, laziness, none of these wanting. During Whitman's time, the ferry was the way most commuters traveled between Brooklyn and Manhattan.

This makes him significant as an individual but also part of a larger whole. What is the count of the scores or hundreds of years between us?

Crossing brooklyn ferry analysis pdf

Diverge, fine spokes of light, from the shape of my head, or any one's head, in the sunlit water! Burn high your fires, foundry chimneys! In section 6 the poet tells us that he has been engulfed by the same "dark patches" of doubt which have engulfed the reader. Sound out, voices of young men! This section is significant in that it uses the language of incantation. The ferry symbolizes this spatial and temporal movement. Gaze, loving and thirsting eyes, in the house, or street, or public assembly! These and all else were to me the same as they are to you, I loved well those cities, loved well the stately and rapid river, The men and women I saw were all near to me, Others the same—others who look back on me because I look'd forward to them, The time will come, though I stop here to-day and to-night. These and all else were to me the same as they are to you, I loved well those cities, loved well the stately and rapid river, The men and women I saw were all near to me, Others the same—others who look back on me because I look'd forward to them, The time will come, though I stop here to-day and to-night.

Live, old life! Buy Study Guide Summary: In this poem, the speaker describes his daily commute on a ferry running between Brooklyn and Manhattan.

teaching crossing brooklyn ferry

The poet, in section 5, poses a question about the relationship between himself and the generations to come. What is more subtle than this which ties me to the woman or man that looks in my face?

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Crossing Brooklyn Ferry by Walt Whitman